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  1. #435
    Quote Originally Posted by Jasoonnn  [View Original Post]
    I think this depends on if you are able to pay in local currency with Transferencia. In dollars it will be more.

    As for buying a house, I haven't looked into that, and not sure of the laws if foreigners are allowed to do that.

    Someone else might be able to answer that, I would be interested in that answer as well.
    This site mentions foreign ownership of real estate. Needs a lawyer to advise. http://www.casatrudel.com/living.htm.

    Dolartoday quotes US $1 = BS. 157,000 in CCS & 186,000 in Cucuta. Meltdown; something's got to give.

  2. #434
    Quote Originally Posted by BobSmith1  [View Original Post]
    I checked Airbnb too but its not as cheap as I thought. I went to Ukraine and its a little cheaper than Venezuela. I stayed in fine area for like $20 to $25 a night but Venezuela is like $30. I thought its cheap. I was thinking buying a huge house there for 20 K NO?
    I think this depends on if you are able to pay in local currency with Transferencia. In dollars it will be more.

    As for buying a house, I haven't looked into that, and not sure of the laws if foreigners are allowed to do that.

    Someone else might be able to answer that, I would be interested in that answer as well.

  3. #433

    I thought its cheap stay but its not why?

    I checked Airbnb too but its not as cheap as I thought. I went to Ukraine and its a little cheaper than Venezuela. I stayed in fine area for like $20 to $25 a night but Venezuela is like $30. I thought its cheap. I was thinking buying a huge house there for 20 K NO?

  4. #432

    Happy New Year!

    Just wanted to wish a Happy New Year for the people on the ground in Venezuela. Hoping This year will bring stability and change that benefits the people of a beautiful country.

  5. #431

    AirBNB Apartments in Caracas

    https://www.airbnb.co.uk/s/caracas/h...s_tag=Qy00y7gA

    This could be a cheap route in for the newbie without local contacts. Prices are closer to the official DICOM rate than the black market but, once in, the host will likely help out with money exchange in return for an extension. It provides an address to give to the embassy / immigration. Use discretion if bringing back girls -- some hosts could be offended -- possibly ask first. 1 = US $1. 33 . Most apartments seem to be in the better areas of Caracas.

    Caracas tops most-dangerous cities table.

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/most-v...-world-2017-4/#22-tijuana-mexico-had-5306-homicides-per-100000-residents-29.

    Is it easy to call taxis by cellphone, as in Colombia? For those staying longer-term, are there freight-forwarders shipping from USA to Venezuela at reasonable rates? I can get mail-order goods shipped from Miami to Colombia for about $3. 50 per pound weight, including customs clearance, but they don't ship to Venezuela. With all the local shortages, a reliable shipper is essential to maintain a good quality-of-life.

  6. #430
    I think it was mentioned earlier in the thread, but RIF = Registro de Informacion Fiscal, or Tax Registry Information. It's the national registry run by the SENIAT, the Venezuelan tax authority. When you are registered they give you a RIF number, which is quite important for identification purposes for us Venezuelans. It is not as universal as a Cedula (which is our main ID document), but it can be used for a lot of commercial purposes, including opening a bank account. It's normally something that a foreigner with a tourist visa wouldn't be able to obtain, but as with many things here in Venezuela, money makes impossible things happen.

    And Trevor2522, that law is indeed a thing, five star hotels must charge in dollars to foreigners. While I was in Caracas I did arrange accomodations in a lower tier hotel (the Chacao Cumberland, which is pretty decent and is in a good location) to another forum memeber, perhaps he can elaborate on the matter.

  7. #429
    Quote Originally Posted by Haitek  [View Original Post]
    This is what I did, I gave a french bootle of red wine to the guy who introduce me to his amiga at BNC. You known well Venezuela, you need good relation.
    But all thing is legal, at BNC is legal to open a bank account to a foreigner with a foreign passeport. I owne a legal account on my name with a tourist visa on my passeport. Most important document to provide to BNC was my RIF.
    Quote Originally Posted by Haitek  [View Original Post]
    My BNC account is exactly working like a local account, with wired transfert activated throught internet and linking to my local phone for receving confirmation code. Of course I owne a tarjeta to paid everything. And my cedula is my european passeport number.
    What is a RIF? Is that the Venezuelan equivalent of a US social security number? How did you obtain your RIF?

    Good on you that your account is fully functional, unlike mine.

  8. #428

    The Law on Tourists Paying for Hotels in Venezuela

    According to information from the Exchange Agreement No. 36 published in Official Gazette, No. 40,881, published on April 11,2016: every foreign tourist, who stays for more than 1 night and does not have a Venezuelan work visa, is in the obligation to pay for services to the hotel, with a credit card or foreign debit. The amount will be traded according to the complementary exchange rate Dicom BsF. 11.311 (eleven point three). https://dolartoday.com US $1 = BS. (BSF) 112,800 . The minimum monthly wage at that rate comes to $2.50 .

    This law negates the advantage of using black market exchange rates, or cash, for tourists. I see it applies for 'more than 1 night'. Without local contacts, a tourist would need to pre-book a room by card in order to show immigration they have somewhere to stay. Once checked-in, I expect some hotels will accept cash or bank transfers at nearer the realistic black-market rate. Any advice on how to handle this issue for a good hotel like the J W Marriott in Caracas? Going in green, without contacts, is going to expose the newbie tourist to security issues, cash shortages and money exchange at the terrible official rate.

    Someone suggested that competition from Venezolanas in Colombia had depressed the commercial rates for sex there, especially in border areas like Cucuta. Is it worth the compromise, given the safer environment?

  9. #427
    Quote Originally Posted by Jinxx  [View Original Post]
    I have an account with BDV Banco De Venezuela, but it's almost useless. With my account I can only deposit cash or checks and use it at punto de ventas or ATM's. I cannot use online banking or send / receive transferencias. The bank told me that since I don't have a Venezuelan cedula that I cannot "afiiliar" my online banking to my cell phone number.

    How does it work with your BNC account? Are you able to use online banking and send / receive electronic transferencias? If you can that's a big plus, even though an account with Banesco or Mercantil would be even better.

    One thing that I noticed in Vzla is that when dealing with banks, cell phone stores / providers, real estate people is that if you ask 10 different people the same question you will get 10 different answers. From what I understand supposedly the only reason I was allowed to open an account with BDV was because I knew somebody who's cousin was the branch manager at the bank and he personally gave the order to open my account even though a foreigner cannot open an account with them. I'd gone into a Banesco branch to try to open an account and was told that it's impossible for anyone without a Venezuelan cedula to open an account with them, same scenario with Banco Mercantil.
    My BNC account is exactly working like a local account, with wired transfert activated throught internet and linking to my local phone for receving confirmation code. Of course I owne a tarjeta to paid everything. And my cedula is my european passeport number.

  10. #426
    Quote Originally Posted by MaraCucho  [View Original Post]
    The only way is by greasing the hand of a manager.
    This is what I did, I gave a french bootle of red wine to the guy who introduce me to his amiga at BNC. You known well Venezuela, you need good relation.
    But all thing is legal, at BNC is legal to open a bank account to a foreigner with a foreign passeport. I owne a legal account on my name with a tourist visa on my passeport. Most important document to provide to BNC was my RIF.

  11. #425
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor2522  [View Original Post]
    Even EU passport holders, Canadians etc. Officially need a visa for land entry. 90 days are only granted gratis at airports of entry. It depends how well the official concerned knows the law. US citizens resident in Colombia, holding a cedula, may be treated leniently but, officially, also need a visa.

    Does the Venezuelan consulate in Cucuta issue visas to Westerners on application? Or their embassy in Bogota within a short timeframe? If flying domestic from San Antonio (?) or El Vigia to Caracas, are passports checked for visas, or just as security ID? For a country short on foreign reserves, they're hardly going the right way to encourage tourism, or showing a friendly face to the world. Thanks.
    I hold both US and non-US passport and I was able to enter via Cucuta-San Antonio. As soon as I crossed the border bridge I went to the migracion office and showed them my non-US passport and they gave me the 90 day stamp with no problem. I then took a bus to Caracas, and at a military checkpoint I was thoroughly searched and questioned by the "guardia civil" which was a scary ordeal. I highly recommend not taking to a bus to Caracas if you enter via land, better to fly.

    The first time I tried to enter the same way via land entry they wouldn't stamp my US passport which was all I had at the time. But there is nothing to stop you from entering the country without the stamp. I then took a bus from San Antonio to San Cristobal. We passed a checkpoint but the soldier did not board the bus to check everyone individually. If they would've checked me and saw that I was in the country illegally I probably would've been screwed. On this trip I only went as far as San Cristobal, stayed for a week, then took a bus back to San Antonio then crossed back to Colombia. If you try this don't bother getting the exit stamp from Colombia migracion because you will have a problem when you return to Colombia for the entry stamp and they see that you don't have an entry or exit stamp from Venezuela. I had to bribe the Colombian migracion official to give me the entry stamp. Now I don't know if your passport would be checked for a visa when taking a domestic flight, but I wouldn't be brave enough to try it.

    I think the main problem with foreign tourism is the money situation. If a tourist exchanges money at the LEGAL money exchange then Venezuela is prohibitively expensive. The only way to manage is to use the black market exchange rate which is technically illegal. I think the government is using the fixed exchange rate to intentionally impoverish it's own people and force them to be more dependent on the government for access to dollars / foreign commerce. It's a control tactic. You might say well that doesn't make sense since it cuts off foreign investment and tourism revenue. Well the current president is a FORMER BUS DRIVER WHO DIDN'T EVEN GRADUATE FROM HIGH SCHOOL. Maduro is only following the dictator playbook laid out by the Cuban, Russian, Chinese, and N. Korean dictatorship governments. He is more concerned with holding on to power than he is with serving the best interests of the nation.

  12. #424
    Quote Originally Posted by Jinxx  [View Original Post]
    You can cross the border without visa, passport or anything but you will be an illegal alien and subject to arrest or have to bribe your way out of trouble. If you cross at Cucuta / San Antonio crossing you can take a bus and you SHOULD be able to make it to San Cristobal without a problem, that is if you don't get checked at a police checkpoint. I've done it but would NEVER try it again. But if you try to go further into the interior of Venezuela you will definitely come to a police / military checkpoint where you will be checked for visa / passport. If you have a passport other than US then you have no problem, you don't need a visa. Only US passport holders need the visa.

    Unless you are a crazy thrillseeker type it's NOT worth it. Just go to the chica clubs in Cucuta, they're full of hot Venezolanas.
    Even EU passport holders, Canadians etc. Officially need a visa for land entry. 90 days are only granted gratis at airports of entry. It depends how well the official concerned knows the law. US citizens resident in Colombia, holding a cedula, may be treated leniently but, officially, also need a visa.

    Does the Venezuelan consulate in Cucuta issue visas to Westerners on application? Or their embassy in Bogota within a short timeframe? If flying domestic from San Antonio (?) or El Vigia to Caracas, are passports checked for visas, or just as security ID? For a country short on foreign reserves, they're hardly going the right way to encourage tourism, or showing a friendly face to the world. Thanks.

  13. #423
    Quote Originally Posted by Haitek  [View Original Post]
    Did you try with Banco Nacional de Credito?
    I have a tourist visa and I owne a account at BNC, and I known other tourists guys who have a bank account at BNC.
    Absolutely. I actually spent three days in Caracas exclusively going to every bank I could find (Venezuela, Mercantil, Provincial, Banesco, Bancrecer, Bancaribe, Nacional de Credito, Venezolano de Credito, Caroni, Banplus, Del Sur, etc) and the answer was always the same. A foreigner with a tourist visa can't open a local bank account in bolivares, it's the current regulation. The only way is by greasing the hand of a manager.

  14. #422
    Quote Originally Posted by Haitek  [View Original Post]
    Did you try with Banco Nacional de Credito?
    I have a tourist visa and I owne a account at BNC, and I known other tourists guys who have a bank account at BNC.
    I have an account with BDV Banco De Venezuela, but it's almost useless. With my account I can only deposit cash or checks and use it at punto de ventas or ATM's. I cannot use online banking or send / receive transferencias. The bank told me that since I don't have a Venezuelan cedula that I cannot "afiiliar" my online banking to my cell phone number.

    How does it work with your BNC account? Are you able to use online banking and send / receive electronic transferencias? If you can that's a big plus, even though an account with Banesco or Mercantil would be even better.

    One thing that I noticed in Vzla is that when dealing with banks, cell phone stores / providers, real estate people is that if you ask 10 different people the same question you will get 10 different answers. From what I understand supposedly the only reason I was allowed to open an account with BDV was because I knew somebody who's cousin was the branch manager at the bank and he personally gave the order to open my account even though a foreigner cannot open an account with them. I'd gone into a Banesco branch to try to open an account and was told that it's impossible for anyone without a Venezuelan cedula to open an account with them, same scenario with Banco Mercantil.

  15. #421
    Quote Originally Posted by MaraCucho  [View Original Post]
    That issue I have been mentioning in past posts about a debit card account that I tried to open to a forum member, ended up in total failure. Said forum memeber will probably make his own post, but basically he paid for something that isn't usable and caused him a lot of troubles, and I must take responsability for that. I fully admit that I am not reliable for these sort of things, so please refrain from asking me to help in Venezuela.
    Did you try with Banco Nacional de Credito?
    I have a tourist visa and I owne a account at BNC, and I known other tourists guys who have a bank account at BNC.

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